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2012 Msgr. Philip J. Murnion Lecture of the Catholic Common Ground Initiative
"Vatican II - Celebrating 50 Years: The Significance of Gaudium et Spes"
Sample

Keynote Speaker:  Rev. John O'Malley, S.J., author and professor of Theology at Georgetown University. 

The Catholic University of America
Washington D.C.
Friday, June 1, 2012



Video

Presentation of the 2012 Bernardin Award and Murnion Lecturein its entirety.

 



Biography


John W. O’Malley, S.J., is University Professor in the Theology Department at Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.  A native of Ohio, he is a specialist in the religious culture of early modern Europe, especially Italy.  He received his doctorate in history from Harvard University   Among his seven monographs are Praise and Blame in Renaissance Rome (Duke UP, 1979), which received the Marraro Prize from the American Historical Association, and Trent and All That (Harvard UP, 2000), which received the Roland Bainton Prize from the Sixteenth Century Studies Conference.  His best known book is The First Jesuits (Harvard UP, 1993), which received both the Jacques Barzun Prize for Cultural History from the American Philosophical Society and the Philip Schaff Prize from the American Society for Church History.  The First Jesuits has been translated into ten languages.   Rome in the Renaissance, Religious Culture in the Sixteenth Century, and Tradition and Transition: Historical Perspectives on Vatican II are collections of some of his articles.   His Four Cultures of the West (Harvard UP, 2004) has been translated into Italian under the sponsorship of the Catholic University of Milan and into Chinese under the sponsorship of the University of Taiwan.  He has also edited or co-edited a number of volumes, including three in the Collected Works of Erasmus series published by the University of Toronto Press.  With the same press he co-edited The Jesuits: Cultures, Sciences and the Arts (1999, Alpha Sigma Nu best-book prize) and The Jesuits II: Cultures, Sciences, and the Arts (2006).  His latest works on the Jesuits are The Jesuits and the Arts (St. Joseph’s UP, 2005), co-edited with Gauvin Alexander Bailey, and Constructing a Saint Through Images, an annotated facsimile of the 1609 illustrated life of Saint Ignatius of Loyola (same press, 2008).  He recently assumed the editorship of a new series of monographs from St. Joseph’s UP entitled “Early Modern Catholicism and the Visual Arts.”  What Happened at Vatican II, was published by Harvard in 2008 and has been  translated into French, Italian, and Polish. A History of the the Popes (Rowman and Littlefield) appeared in October, 2009 and has appeared in Polish, Spanish, and Italian.  He has recently completed a book on the Council of Trent to be published by Harvard, 2012.  A full list of his publications (except book reviews) up to 2001 can be found in Early Modern Catholicism: Essays in Honour of John W. O’Malley, S.J. (Toronto UP, 2001), pp. xxvii-xxxiii.

 

John O’Malley has lectured widely in North America and Europe on both professional and more popular topics.  He has held fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the American Philosophical Society, Villa I Tatti (the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies, Florence), and the American Academy in Rome (Prix de Rome).  He is past president of the American Catholic Historical Association and of the Renaissance Society of America.  In 1995 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, in 1997 to the American Philosophical Society, and in 2001 to the Accademia di san Carlo, Ambrosian Library, Milan.  He holds the Johannes Quasten Medal from The Catholic University of America for distinguished achievement in Religious Studies, is a correspondent for the Vatican’s Pontifical Committee for Historical Sciences, and holds  a number of honorary degrees.  In 2002 he received the lifetime achievement award from the Society for Italian Historical Studies, in 2005 the corresponding award from the Renaissance Society of America, and in 2012 the same award from the American Catholic Historical Association.  He is a Roman Catholic priest and a member of the Society of Jesus.

           

 

John W. O’Malley, S.J., is University Professor in the Theology Department at
Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. A native of Ohio, he is a specialist in the religious
culture of early modern Europe, especially Italy. He received his doctorate in history from
Harvard University Among his seven monographs are Praise and Blame in Renaissance Rome
(Duke UP, 1979), which received the Marraro Prize from the American Historical Association,
and Trent and All That (Harvard UP, 2000), which received the Roland Bainton Prize from the
Sixteenth Century Studies Conference. His best known book is The First Jesuits (Harvard UP,
1993), which received both the Jacques Barzun Prize for Cultural History from the American
Philosophical Society and the Philip Schaff Prize from the American Society for Church History.
The First Jesuits has been translated into ten languages. Rome in the Renaissance, Religious
Culture in the Sixteenth Century, and Tradition and Transition: Historical Perspectives on
Vatican II are collections of some of his articles. His Four Cultures of the West (Harvard UP,
2004) has been translated into Italian under the sponsorship of the Catholic University of Milan
and into Chinese under the sponsorship of the University of Taiwan. He has also edited or co-
edited a number of volumes, including three in the Collected Works of Erasmus series published
by the University of Toronto Press. With the same press he co-edited The Jesuits: Cultures,
Sciences and the Arts (1999, Alpha Sigma Nu best-book prize) and The Jesuits II: Cultures,
Sciences, and the Arts (2006). His latest works on the Jesuits are The Jesuits and the Arts (St.
Joseph’s UP, 2005), co-edited with Gauvin Alexander Bailey, and Constructing a Saint Through
Images, an annotated facsimile of the 1609 illustrated life of Saint Ignatius of Loyola (same
press, 2008). He recently assumed the editorship of a new series of monographs from St.
Joseph’s UP entitled “Early Modern Catholicism and the Visual Arts.” What Happened at
Vatican II, was published by Harvard in 2008 and has been translated into French, Italian, and
Polish. A History of the the Popes (Rowman and Littlefield) appeared in October, 2009 and has
appeared in Polish, Spanish, and Italian. He has recently completed a book on the Council of
Trent to be published by Harvard, 2012. A full list of his publications (except book reviews) up
to 2001 can be found in Early Modern Catholicism: Essays in Honour of John W. O’Malley, S.J.
(Toronto UP, 2001), pp. xxvii-xxxiii.
 
John O’Malley has lectured widely in North America and Europe on both professional
and more popular topics. He has held fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the
National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the
American Philosophical Society, Villa I Tatti (the Harvard University Center for Italian
Renaissance Studies, Florence), and the American Academy in Rome (Prix de Rome). He is past
president of the American Catholic Historical Association and of the Renaissance Society of
America. In 1995 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, in 1997 to the
American Philosophical Society, and in 2001 to the Accademia di san Carlo, Ambrosian Library,
Milan. He holds the Johannes Quasten Medal from The Catholic University of America for
distinguished achievement in Religious Studies, is a correspondent for the Vatican’s Pontifical
Committee for Historical Sciences, and holds a number of honorary degrees. In 2002 he
received the lifetime achievement award from the Society for Italian Historical Studies, in 2005
the corresponding award from the Renaissance Society of America, and in 2012 the same award
from the American Catholic Historical Association. He is a Roman Catholic priest and a
member of the Society of Jesus.